Keyham Lodge & Millgate School e-Safety Project – Staff, Parents & Carers

Keyham Lodge and Millgate School are currently working together on an ambitious project which will establish the school federation as a national e-safety centre of excellence for schools that support learners with social, emotional and mental health difficulties (SEMH). The project aims to increase student, staff and parental awareness. The project will create and share a range of high quality cross-curricular resources that can be used to support SEMD learners. A bespoke training package for staff and learners is being created with the help of experts, specifically focusing on e-safety in relation to mobile technologies. An e-safety questionnaire is also being designed to find out what pupils, parents, carers and staff know, and identify areas where more support may be needed. Survey findings will inform the direction of the project and the resources created. You can read the initial project post as well as the results of the student survey.

Project lead Darren John (Learning Technology Lead for the two schools) updates on the findings so far from the project e-safety survey:

Keyham Lodge and Millgate are federated schools supporting children with Social, Emotional and Mental Health (SEMH) needs. We deal with some of the most vulnerable children in Leicester City and see e-safety as a vital educational area for keeping them safe.

We teamed up with James Diamond to produce e-safety materials for SEMH because of his role as Safeguarding Officer for Leicester City Council, as well as his interest in e-safety and the recognised contacts he has made in this field, including Ken Corish and Professor Andy Phippen of South West Grid for Learning (who agreed to provide advice on the student survey). James is currently employed as the Leader of Digital Learning at Abbotsholme School in Staffordshire, but continues to provide online safety guidance to schools and organisations.

Producing the initial questionnaires to give to stakeholders

Before creating materials, we decided to ask pupils, staff and parents to complete a confidential online survey in order to get a clear idea as to how they perceive online safety. All pupils were given the opportunity to fill in the questionnaire, from Year 5 – 11, with a c.60% return rate. The report from pupils is documented here. This post looks at the survey results from staff, parents and carers.

We used the pupil survey as a starting point, which was devised by Andy Phippen at the University of Plymouth but then further developed.The survey was designed to elicit honest opinions from parents and staff, to gather as true a reflection as possible about their online experiences and how they translate those into helping the young people they are responsible for.

Once implemented, the questionnaires went out to all parents, carers and teachers on SurveyMonkey. The results were then reviewed in meetings between James Diamond and myself, and the findings, along with the pupil results, have been used to design the programme of training now being produced.

The survey & its results – Parents & Carers

Across both schools, there are 151 pupils on roll. 90 at Keyham (78 boys, 12 girls), 61 at Millgate (all boys). Very few parents and carers responded – 16 in total. The questions are listed below:

  1. Which school does your child go to?
  2. What Year group is your child in?
  3. How old are you? (select from age ranges)
  4. Which of the following devices do you have in your house? (tick as many as apply)
  • Mobile/smart phone/other mobile device eg iPod touch
  • Laptop/netbook
  • Tablet (eg iPad)
  • Home gaming devices eg Xbox360, Wii, Playstation etc.
  • Mobile gaming devices, PSP, Nintendo DS, etc.
  • Desktop computer
  • Television
  • Other (please specify)

5. From the list above (Q4), which device do you primarily use?

6. How much time do you spend online on an average day? (circle the answer)

  • Less than an hour
  • One to three hours
  • Between 3 and 6 hours
  • More than 6 hours

7. How much time do your children spend online on an average evening? (circle the answer)

  • Less than an hour
  • One to three hours
  • Between 3 and 6 hours
  • More than 6 hours

8. What do you use the internet for? (circle the answer)

  • Social networks, eg Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat
  • Instant messaging, e.g. Whatsapp, BBM, Skype.
  • Gaming
  • Shopping
  • News
  • Browsing/general entertainment
  • Listening to music
  • Uploading/content creation e.g. YouTube
  • Other (please specify)
  1. If you use social networks to talk to your friends, please list the ones you use regularly
  2. Do you know how to protect your digital life online? (yes, no, don’t know)
  3. If you play video games, do you play online?
  4. If you play video games, please list the ones you play regularly
  5. If you do use the internet to download music/films/software, do you do this legally? (yes, no, don’t know)
  6. Do you know if your children illegally download Music, Movies or Software? (yes, no, don’t know)
  7. Have your children ever seen/told you that they’ve seen something online that has made them feel upset? (yes,no)
  8. If yes, would you like to explain what this was?
  9. Have your children ever received nasty comments/content online? (yes, no, don’t know)
  10. To your knowledge, have your children ever said anything nasty to anyone online? (yes, no)
  11. Do you strongly agree/agree/have no opinion/disagree or strongly disagree with the following statements: (circle as appropriate)
  • My children know more about the internet than I do
  • It is none of my business what my children do online
  • In the last 12 months, I have spoken to my children about protecting themselves online, including using privacy settings and reporting functions.

20. Are there any rules at home for using the internet?

21. If yes, what sort of rules are there (please circle all that apply)?

  • Parents/carers control access to sites children can visit
  • Ages restrictions on internet access
  • Parents can see what children look at online
  • Only allowed online for a certain amount of time
  • Not allowed online after a certain time in the evening
  • Only allowed to go online in family rooms eg living room/kitchen
  • Other (please specify)
  1. If you answered yes to rules at home, can your children get around these restrictions? (yes, no, Some of them)

23. Who do you think your children would you turn to if they were upset by something that happened online (please tick all that apply)?

  • Friends
  • Parents/carers
  • Other family member
  • School/teacher
  • Police
  • Other (please specify)

Question analysis

Q1-3.

Of the 16 parents or carers who answered, 11 have children at Keyham, 5 have children at Millgate. No year 11’s were represented. 44% of parents/carers (7) are between the ages of 35-44.

Year No of children
5 1
6 3
7 4
8 4
9 2
10 3
11 0

Q4 & 5.

As with current national trends, most houses have quite a few devices with internet access. Only 18% have desktop PC’s in the house, with 94% having TV’s. Stationary home gaming devices came in at 84%. The vast majority of internet-enabled devices are mobile (laptops, tablets and phones etc.). The primary internet access device is the smart phone, at 82%, followed by the TV at 12%, then the tablet at 5%. No adults connect via a home gaming device, which is a surprise.

Q6 & 7.

37.5% spend less than one hour online every day. 37.5% spend 1-3 hours online. 25% spend upwards of 3 hours. Considering the primary internet device is the smart phone, this is no surprise, with the ability to surf the net on the move. 53% believe their children spend 1 – 3 hours online every day, with nearly 6% believing it is over 6 hours. A future questionnaire may ask where this takes place and on what devices. Are they aware how much time young people spend on smart phones whilst out and about?

Q8.

What parents and guardians use the internet for is roughly an even spread – with social media services leading slightly (88%). The lowest three responses were uploading/content creation (6%), listening to music (35%) and gaming (35%).

Q9.

13 out of 14 answers were Facebook. This fits in with the adult demographic range who have been part of the Facebook generation.

Q10.

62.5% said they know how to protect their digital life online, with 12.5% saying no and 25% unsure. We feel if you’re unsure, the answer is probably no! Digital safety education needs to come from both home and school, so this clearly shows we have more to do to help adults support the children.

Q11.

Only 7% say they play video games online, whereas the majority of young people do. Understanding the potential, as well as the possible risks of online gaming needs to be focused on as a priority for parent/guardian training.

Q12.

With so few answers for this (50% of a small sample) most answers actually showed family orientated games, based on mobile devices, rather than big blockbuster gaming device titles, showing the differences between adults and children highlighted by Q5.

Q13 & 14.

64% say they are legal downloaders, with 14% not sure and 21% admitted to illegal downloading. A whopping 73% were unsure if the children in their care illegally downloaded music, movies or software. Illegal downloading clearly needs to be targeted across the board.

Q15 & 16.

87% say their children have never told them they’d seen something upsetting online, leaving 13% who had. This included sexual images and animal cruelty. This suggests a high number of children won’t talk about their experiences online to parents. Do they talk to their peer group? Or another trusted adult? Some more questioning is required here.

Q17 & 18.

A straight 50/50 split on whether their children have received nasty comments online, with 73% stating their child has never been nasty to someone online. This seems a little high, but may be skewed by the small sample group. This needs to be further clarified by the training.

Q19.

Most adults believe they should be aware what their child is up to online (7% disagreed). 87% have talked to their charge about personal digital security over the past 12 months. This is obviously very positive, but are they up to date with the current issues? Training will be used to highlight this.

Q20 & 21.

81% have rules at home for using the internet, with a broad sweep across all the answer choices. The most common is that children are time-limited (64%). Only 28% say access is only allowed in a common area, such as the living room. Does this reflect on the fact that devices have become more mobile, so any room is now accessible?

Q22.

7% can apparently get round the rules in place for access at home, 36% say some rules can be circumvented. 57% are sure all rules are enforced.

Q23.

79% feel the children in their charge would turn to them about something upsetting online. Interestingly, friends came 4th on the list, at 21%. Most children would see friends far higher up that list.

The survey & its results – Staff

1. What of the following devices do you regularly use? (tick as many as apply)

2. Which years do you teach/work with (tick all that apply) (Yrs 5-11)

3. Are you male or female? (radio buttons)

4. How old are you? (select from age ranges)

5. Which school do you work at?

6. Which of the following devices do you regularly use? (tick as many as apply)

  • Television
  • Desktop computer
  • Mobile gaming devices, PSP, Nintendo DS, etc.
  • Home gaming devices e.g. Xbox360, Wii, Playstation etc.
  • Tablet (e.g. iPad)
  • Laptop/netbook
  • Mobile/smart phone/other mobile device e.g. iPod touch
  • Other (please specify)

7. How much time do you spend online on an average evening?

  • Less than an hour
  • One to three hours
  • Between 3 and 6 hours
  • More than 6 hours

8. What do you use the internet for in your spare time?

  • Social networks, e.g. Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat
  • Instant Messaging, e.g. Whatsapp, BBM, Skype.
  • Gaming
  • Shopping
  • News
  • Browsing/general entertainment
  • Listening to music
  • Uploading/content creation e.g. YouTube
  • Other (please specify)

9. If you use social networks to talk to your friends, please list the ones you use regularly

10. If you play video games, do you play online? (yes, no)

11. If you play video games, please list the ones you play regularly

12. If you do use the internet to download music/films, do you do this legally?

13. Have any of your students ever seen/told you that they’ve seen something online that has made them feel upset?

14. If yes, would you like to explain what this was?

15. Have any of your students ever told you they have received nasty comments/content online? (yes, no)

16. In the last 12 months, have you spoken to students about protecting themselves online, including using privacy settings, reporting functions, password protection etc? (yes, no)

17. Have you ever received nasty comments/content online? (yes, no)

18. Do you strongly agree/agree/have no opinion/disagree or strongly disagree with the following statements:

  • Most children know more about the Internet than I do
  • It is none of my business what my students do online

19. Are you aware that there are any rules at school for using the Internet/digital technology (e.g. mobile phones, tablets etc)? (yes, no don’t know)

20. If yes, what sort of rules are there (please tick all that apply)?

  • School controls access to sites children can visit
  • Only allowed online for a certain amount of time
  • Not allowed to use devices at certain times of the day
  • Not allowed to use devices in certain areas of the school
  • Other (please specify)

21. Who do you think your students would turn to if they were upset by something that happened online (please tick all that apply)?

  • Friends
  • Parents/carers
  • Other family member
  • School/teacher
  • Police
  • Other (please specify)

22. Have you talked to any parents/carers of pupils about child online usage at home in the past 12 months? (yes or no?)

Question analysis

Q1-3.

49 staff answered the questionnaire. 21 from Millgate, 14 from Keyham, as well as 14 who didn’t answer Q1. The majority of staff respondents were aged between 25 and 34. With a fairly young demographic, we would expect knowledge of e-safety to be quite reasonable. 60% of responders are female, 40% male.

Age range %
18-24 2.04
25-34 40.82
35-44 24.49
45-54 22.45
55+ 10.20

Q4.

The majority of answers show staff evenly working across Key Stage 3 (Year 7-11), with a small number working across Key Stage 2.

Q5.

Smart phones, laptops, TV’s and Tablets are the most used devices. 81% use laptops, which is up on national trends, but misleading, as the schools supply laptops to many. Interestingly, only 10% have home gaming devices. We expected more because of the age range of this group of staff.

Q6.

55% spend 1-3 hours online in the evening, with 15% between 3 – more than 6. Once again, with the demographic, we were surprised 31% spent less than an hour online.

Q7.

The leading use for the internet was shopping, at 88%, closely followed by social networking services (71%) and news (67%). Only 20% of staff listed uploading and content creation, so as with parents and guardians, this seems not particularly common place. More children are starting to do this, perhaps because of the perceived success of YouTubers, so this needs to be covered in a little more depth.

Q8.

Facebook is listed as the main social network, by some considerable distance. WhatsApp, Snapchat and Instagram also got a mention in dispatches, but Facebook was the overwhelming favourite.

Q9 & 10.

80% don’t play video games online, which was a big surprise, as we thought more of the younger staff would. With results from both of the adult surveys, it appears necessary to do some real focus work on this. Do staff and parents/guardians really understand the advantages and risks of online gaming? The games listed as played are the normal blockbusters, such as Halo, Forza and FIFA, so no surprises.

Q11.

69% say they download music and games illegally. This suggests people aren’t really aware of the consequences, which is a fairly normal trend. We therefore have to ensure the correct message is put across to the children, with a clear understanding of ethics and consequences. Interestingly, only 5% were unsure if they were being illegal.

Q12.

81% of staff say students haven’t talked to them about online risks, with 19% saying children had talked to them. We need to ensure there are lines open to an adult, either at home or at school and that they have the necessary tools to deal with the issues. We also thought that the percentage would be higher, particularly in the SEMH environment, because we have so much more one to one contact time than mainstream schools, and have opportunities to build very productive, close relationships. Those pupils that had discussed things they had seen online talked about terrorism, bullying and animals being hurt.

Q14.

51% of staff say pupils have told them about nasty comments online. A higher percentage than have been told about things that have upset pupils, which is interesting. Pupils therefore differentiate between content they have seen online, as opposed to specific bullying on the internet.

Q15.

83% say they have talked about online safety with pupils over the past 12 months, which is good, particularly in light of child protection and e-safety being an all staff issue. Training should embed it further in to the whole curriculum.

Q16.

The majority of staff haven’t received nasty comments online(85%), but a far higher percentage of pupils have, more so in SEMH than mainstream schools.

Q17.

50% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that children know more about the internet than they do. This came as a shock to us, because most of the younger staff are internet-savvy. However, although a very small percentage, we were more surprised that 2% feel it is none of their business what children do online. We need to ensure responsibility for such things is very clear.

Q18 & 19.

98% are aware there are rules at school for using the internet and digital technology. 2% aren’t sure. A clear understanding that the school is filtered and controls access to sites children can visit came out in Q19, with 100% saying they understand this.

Q20.

90% of staff think pupils would turn to them for online support, which isn’t supported by evidence from the pupil questionnaire. However, 83% said pupils would turn to their friends, which is a better match to pupil beliefs. This suggests staff may need to work harder on pupil confidence with regards to e-safety, which can be worked in to the training as well.

Q21.

25% have talked to parents/carers about child online usage in the past 12 months. Maybe the federation should look at building this type of conversation in to all home visits?

Plan for training sessions

We have decided to organise the training in the following way:

Three one hour lesson plans which can be split in to 20 minute segments for short, sharp sessions designed to help students, staff and parents examine how the internet and their online behaviour impacts on different relationships, with focus highlighted on the areas shown in the three questionnaires.

Each session will include a video and exercise, or discussion, facilitated by staff. The theme follows relationships between an individual and the internet.

  1. Relationship with YOU

  • Screen time (sleep, anxiety, health)
  • Inappropriate content (pornography, age-restricted entertainment)
  • Digital Literacy (online resilience, assessing reliability of online information)
  1. Relationship with THOSE AROUND YOU

  • Cyberbullying
  • Sexting
  • ‘Nettiquette’
  • Screen time (relationship with others)
  1. Relationship with THE WORLD

  • What the law says (sexting/revenge porn, trolling, libel/contempt of court, hacking)
  • Digital Footprint (how the world sees you, diminished opportunities)
  • Privacy/anonymity (advantages and disadvantages of online anonymity, when not to share information)

The first three videos are near completion. Unfortunately, a joint testing opportunity between Abbotsholme and Millgate had to be cancelled recently, but we are hopeful it will be re-scheduled soon. If not, it will be trialled at Millgate in the very near future.

 

 

 

 

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